Liam Gillick

Liam Gillick  And a mirror... Or a mirror...  2016 birch plywood, two pack lacquer - RAL5022, mirror 200 x 102.5 x 30 cm / 78.7 x 40.4 x 11.8 in 

Liam Gillick
Intermodal Elevation
2015
powder coated aluminium, plexiglas
200 x 235.5 x 105.5 cm / 78.7 x 92.7 x 41.5 in

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Liam Gillick riggedattraction 2014 powder coated aluminium 50 elements 180 x 640 x 10 cm / 70.9 x 252 x 3.9 total size

Liam Gillick
Complete Bin Development
2013
powder coated aluminium, Plexiglas
6 elements, each element 300 x 150 x 150 cm / 118.1 x 59.1 x 59.1 in 

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Progression Stream
Devised Production Structure
(The doors to the administration building have been left open) 2012
Three elements
Element 1: powder-coated aluminium, Plexiglas, 200 x 250 x 240 cm
Element 2: powder-coated aluminium, 200 x 250 x 240 cm
Element 3: Vinyl text cut from Adobe Illustrator™ EPS file, Dimensions variable

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Lesser Reduction
2012
powder coated aluminium
16 elements
each element 180 x 3 x 15 cm / 70.9 x 1.2 x 5.9
over all size 180 x 198 cm / 70.9 x 78 in  

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A Game of War Structure
2011
anodized and powder-coated aluminium
edition of 4
106.5 x 125 x 155 cm / 41.9 x 49.2 x 61 in
IRISH MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, DUBLIN

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Multipied Resistance Screened
2010
site specific installation
Chateau la Coste, Aix en Provence

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McNamara Motel
1997/2011
white neon
Unique with 1 AP
350 x 37 cm / 137.8 x 14.6 in approx  

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Stacked Revision Structure
2005
powder-coated aluminium
360 x 360 x 360 cm
Collection Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo. NY

Lying on Top of a Building...
The Clouds Looked no Nearer than when I Was Lying on the Street...

2010
stainless steel
each-run-of-text-60x18.28x20cm
Fairmont, Pacific-Rim, Vancouver

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Dynamica Building (with Rodrigo Gomez Villaseñor)
2009
various materials
Gebäude building in Guadalajara, Mexico

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Registered Expansion
2010
powder coated aluminium, transparent Plexiglas,
5 x 200 x 240 cm / 2 in x 78.7 in x 94.5

Negotiated Collapse
2010
powder coated aluminium, transparent Plexiglas, Unique
wall mounted screen structure
230 x 50 x 20 cm / 90.6 x 19.7 x 7.9 in 

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Grouped Decided
2008
painted aluminium, opaque Plexiglas
150 x 300 x 30 cm
59.1 x 118.1 x 11.8 in

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24/7 Kiosk
2009
painted steel
400 x 400 x 400 cm
installation view, Zeebrugge, Belgium

Expansion in the snow
2010
powder coated aluminium, plexiglas, Unique
two elements each:
50 x 200 x 10cm / 19.7 x 78.7 x 3.9 

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Related-Faction
2008
anodised-aluminium, Plexiglas
each element 50x120x10cm
Government-Art-Collection,London

Red snow

2010 

powder coated aluminium, plexiglas, Unique

two elements each: 50 x 75 x 10 cm / 19.7 x 29.5 x 3.9 in 

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all hawaii eNtrees / luNar reGGae
2006
installation view, Irish Museum of Modern Art

Projected Replapse

2008

painted aluminium
20 elements
200 x 15 x 3 cm each
overall size, 200 x 136 x 15 cm
 

Home Office London
2002-2005
Building in Marsham Street, London
Government Art Collection, London

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Four Levels of Exchange
2005
powder-coated aluminium
4 elements, each 50 x 460 cm (diameter)
LAC - Lufthansa Aviation Centre, Frankfurt am Main

56th Floor Structure
2004
powder-coated aluminium
240 x 240 x 240 cm
installation view:
Singular Forms, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2004

Liam Gillick
From 199C to 199D
Le MAGASIN, Centre National d'Art Contemporain de Grenoble
6 JUNE - 7 SEPTEMBER 2014

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For the doors that are welded shut 
Installation view
Kerlin Gallery
27 July – 14 September 2013

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From 199A to 199B
2012
Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College

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Two Short Plays
2009
Eastside Projects, Birmingham

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How are you going to behave? A kitchen cat speaks 2009, wood, lamps, stuffed cat, text, door blinds, MP3 player, dimensions variable

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Executive Two Litre GXL
2009
MAK, Vienna

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Three Perspectives and a Short Scenario
2008-09
Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago

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Wall Diagrams From The Early 1990s and 2000s
2009
House of Art, Czech Republic
 

 

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Theanyspacewhatever
2008
Guggenheim Museum, New York

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Social Sculpture
2008
Whitechapel Gallery, London

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Construcción de Uno (Prequel)
2006
Tate Triennial

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How to improve the World
2006
Hayward Gallery, London

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A short text on the possibility of creating an economy of equivalence

2005

Palais de Tokyo, Paris

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b. 1964, Aylesbury, England.
 
Liam Gillick is one of the most prominent and important figures to have emerged in international contemporary art since the mid-1990s. The diverse forms of his art—ranging across sculpture, installation, film-making, writing and other, widely varied, collaborative projects—often allude to pivotal moments in the history of modern and postmodern art. In particular, the profound, dual influence of minimalism and conceptualism is evident both in his recurrent sculptural use of sleek modular forms (strictly colour-coded based on the RAL system) and in his continued commitment to more ‘dematerialised’ modes of practice (his many texts and talks are, for example, understood as integral elements of his art).
 
Crucially, however, Gillick’s references to prior forms of progressive art are always situated in relation to other vital co-ordinates for understanding the place of art within contemporary culture. Questions of economy, labour and social organisation are ongoing pre-occupations. So, the precisely calibrated use of Plexiglas and aluminium in a Liam Gillick sculpture might recall minimalism’s ‘specific objects’, but these materials are also employed on the basis of other associations—as, for example, the main components of riot shields or corporate signage. Gillick’s work brings apparently contradictory meanings into renewed proximity, thus repeatedly testing—and troubling—the terms and expectations of art within contemporary capitalism.
 
Liam Gillick has had many solo exhibitions and presentations including Fundação de Serralves, Porto (2016-17); Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane (2016); Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam (2015); MAGASIN, Grenoble (2014); The Contemporary Austin, TX (2013-14); Bampton Lecture Series, Columbia University, New York (2013); Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York (2012); Museum Stzuki, Lodz, Poland (2011); Kunst-und Ausstellungshalle der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Bonn, Germany (2010); German Pavilion, Venice Biennale, Venice (2009); Kunsthalle Zürich, Zürich (2008), travelling to Witte de With, Rotterdam (2008); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2005). Selected biennales include EVA International, Ireland (2016); 14th Istanbul Biennale (2015); 8th Shanghai Biennale, Shanghai, China (2010) and the German Pavilion, 53rd Venice Biennale (2009).

 

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Liam Gillick, What's What in a Mirror

Dublin City Gallery The Hugh Lane, Dublin

28 April – 25 September 2016

As part of the Hugh Lane's 2016 Exhibition Programme, 'The Artist as Witness', Liam Gillick will present a solo exhibition of site-specific new work.

 

Artist Talk: the artist will also discuss and reflect on the exhibtion at 5.30pm, Thursday 28th April. No need to book, but places are limited, so please arrive early.

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Liam Gillick, And Then...

EVA International, Limerick

14 April – 14 July 2016

Part of EVA International 2016, And Then... is a spoken word film festival by Liam Gillick. The event will run nightly from 7pm in Mother Macs pub, High Street, Limerick over the opening weekend (14 – 17 April), and every Thursday from 7pm thereafter.

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Liam Gillick, Campaign

Fundação de Serralves, Porto

28 January 2016 – 3 January 2017

Solo exhibition

This first exhibition in Portugal of Liam Gillick (1964, Aylesbury, UK) takes the form of an evolving presentation over one year that reflects Gillick’s long-standing engagement with questions of process, participation, collectivity and decision-making, and of which his varied approach to language and the language of space is an expression.

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Liam Gillick, Istanbul Biennale

5 September – 1 November 2015

Biennale

Liam Gillick will participate in the 14th Istanbul Biennale with Hydrodynamica Applied, a new site-specific piece on the side of the Istanbul Modern building.

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Liam Gillick, All-Imitate-Act

Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

30 May – 23 June 2015

Solo exhibition

From May 30, All-Imitate-Act, a new installation by the British artist Liam Gillick will be on view on the Museumplein, right in front of the Stedelijk.

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Liam Gillick

From 199C to 199D

6 June - 7 September 2014

MAGASIN - Centre National d'Art Contemporain de Grenoble

MAGASIN - Centre National d'Art Contemporain de Grenoble presents an exhibition by artist Liam Gillick. 199C to 199D is the second part of a collaborative process that began with the artist working alongside students of the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College (New York) in 2012. 

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Liam Gillick

Bampton Lecture Series

26 February 2013 - 07 March 2013

Columbia University, New York, Miller Theatre (2960 Broadway at 116th St)

In Collaboration | Bampton Lecture Series

Liam Gillick: Creative Disruptions in the Age of Soft Revolutions

 

Selected as the 38th Bampton Series speaker, artist and Visual Arts faculty Liam Gillick presents a series of four lectures examining a particular genealogy of the modern period that offers a revised understanding of the origins of contemporary art and its analysis. The series is co-presented by the Institute for Religion, Culture and Public Life.


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Liam Gillick

The Journal of the Association of Art Historians

Article first published online: 10 December 2012

Art History Volume 36, Issue 1, pages 180–205, February 2013

Bill Roberts’ “Burnout: Liam Gillick’s Post-Fordist Aesthetics” in the Journal of the Association of Art Historians

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Kerlin Gallery at Abu Dhabi Art 2012

Solo Presentation by Liam Gillick

07 November 2012 - 10 November 2012

Saadiyat Cultural District, Abu Dhabi, UAE

It is with great pleasure that we announce our participation in Abu Dhabi Art, 2012 with a solo presentation of new work by Liam Gillick.

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Liam Gillick

Interviewed by Tom Eccles

November 2012

ArtReview

Liam Gillick interviewed by Tom Eccles in November’s issue of ArtReview

 

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Liam Gillick

Inhabited Architecture

19 September 2012 - 19 May 2013

Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain

The show features six works from the Guggenheim Bilbao Collection, the majority of which have never been exhibited before, including Liam Gillick's How are you going to behave? A kitchen cat speaks (2009) curated by Lucía Agirre

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Liam Gillick

199A TO 199B

23 June 2012 - 21 December 2012

Hessel Museum of Art, Bard College, New York

Liam Gillick: From 199A-199B is one of the featured exhibitions of CCS Bard's 20th anniversary year and offers a comprehensive survey of the artist’s seminal projects and installations which challenged the orthodox presentation and reception of art and its methods and practices during the 1990s.

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Liam Gillick, The Logical Basis

RER Platforms, Gare du Nord, Paris, France

27 November 2015

Public installation

To coincide with COP21, Paris's Climate Conference, Liam Gillick has unveiled a new public work on the RER Platforms of Gare du Nord. 

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Burn Out: Liam Gillick's Post-Fordist Aesthetics

Bill Roberts

Article first published online: 10 December 2012

The Journal of the Association of Art Historians

Art History Volume 36, Issue 1, pages 180–205, February 2013

A broadened perspective on Gillick must, then, look beyond the sculpture, not only to the texts, but towards the performative dimension of his artistic labour in toto, and specifically towards the dynamics of relay, deferral, dislocation and proliferation...

© Association of Art Historians 2012

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Art In Conversation

with William Corwin

May 2012

The Brooklyn Rail

William Corwin sat down with Liam Gillick to discuss a recipe for creating public art that is neither grandiose, kitschy, nor dismissive of the public; the responsibilities of the contemporary curator; and the joys of lying face down on the floor. Gillick currently has an exhibition at Casey Kaplan (Scorpion and und et Felix, May 2 – June 23) and will have a survey at Hessel Museum of Art at Bard College’s Center for Curatorial Studies this summer (June 23 – December 21) titled From 199A to 199B.

This interview originally appeared in a different form on Art International Radio.

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Interview by Tom Eccles

Other People and Their Ideas

November 2012

Art Review

Issue 63, p74

Interview by Tom Eccles

TOM ECCLES

You’ve just completed two major projects, From 199A to 199B: Liam Gillick (a survey of your works from the 1990s) at Bard’s Hessel Museum and To the Moon via the Beach (a large-scale curatorial project with Philippe Parreno and others in the Roman amphithe- atre) in Arles. Both share similar artistic strategies of creating a framework of a platform in which collabo- rative actions can take place. The project in Arles also involved many of the artists with home you’ve worked and been associated with since the 1990s. Besides scale, what do you consider as significant changes since that time?
 
LIAM GILLICK
There are changes that are explicit and others that are implicit. The explicit ones are connected to the shifting economics and structural components of the art context. One aspect that is somewhat overlooked is a rise in in- strumentalisation of advanced art where public or foun- dation funding is involved – that biases towards ‘good works’ that may appear to be responsive or open to ‘the public’. Of course, from the beginning we were all very aware of the difference between a public and an audi- ence. There is an audience for anything, but dealing with a layered, multiple and complex public is another ques- tion altogether. This issue of instrumentalisation is much more problematic to deal with than simple pseudoethical anxieties about markets – which are easy to identify and deconstruct…
 
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