Sam Keogh

Sam Keogh, Kapton Cadaverine, 2017, mixed media, dimensions variable

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Sam Keogh

Clothes Rail, 2016

mixed media

140cm x 175cm x 50cm

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Sam Keogh

Knot Curtain 2016

mixed meda

387cm x 300cm

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Sam Keogh Eurocopter EC135 4 June — 14 August 2016 Dortmunder Kunstverein, Germany

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Sam Keogh
Four Fold
Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin
May 22 - July 22, 2015

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Sam Keogh
Oscar Reduction Chamber
2015
ceramics, galvanized steel bin, kiln shelf and wood
113 x 51 x 47 cm / 44.5 x 20.1 x 18.5 in
15 x 48 .5 x 48.5 cm / 5.9 x 18.9 2 x 19.1 in

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Sam Keogh

Mop (detail)

2013

laminated non-slip vinyl floor, 8 objects, plaster, Jesmonite, acrylic varnish, ink, papier-mâché, found objects

Dimensions variable

Sam Keogh

Mop (detail)

2013

laminated non-slip vinyl floor, with Untitled (mop) - found objects, plaster, jesmonite, acrylic varnish, ink, papier-mâché

33 x 60 x 40 cm / 13 x 23.6 x 15.7 in

Sam Keogh

Mop (detail)

2013

laminated non-slip vinyl floor, with Untitled (eye grottos) - plaster, Jesmonite, acrylic varnish, ink, papier-mâché, aluminium

two elements: element one (pink) 53 x 20 x 50 cm

element two (green) 54 x 44 x 18 cm

Sam Keogh
pictograph 1-22
2013
archival pigment print on Hahnemühle paper
42.0 x 59.4 cm / 16.53 x 23.39 in each

Untitled

2012

performance at Gracelands, Limerick

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Terrestris 

2012

dimensions variable

installation view at the Project Arts Centre

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Monument for Subjects to Come

2011

wood, expanding polyurethane foam, polystyrene, acrylic medium powdered mica, glitter, earth, laminated wrapping paper, selotape, rope, sponge & duct tape

322 x 153 x 480 cm / 126.8 x 60.2 x 189 in

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Heroes

2011

mixed media on canvas

25 x 20 cm / 9.8 x 7.9 in

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Votive

2011

acrylic & glitter on board, ribbon & brass hook

24 x 18 cm / 9.4 x 7.1 in

Baton

2011

mixed media on styrofoam

22 x 3.5 x 3 cm / 8.7 x 1.4 x 1.2 in

St. Albert

2011

acrylic, ink, expanding polyurethane foam, plaster, pigment, glitter on canvas, ribbon and brass hook

20 x 20 cm / 7.9 x 7.9 in

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Crosier

2011

mixed media on board, aluminium tape, threaded bar, ribbon, bell

105 x 22 cm / 41.3 x 8.7 in

Padre

2011

mixed media on panel

24.5 x 18 cm / 9.6 x 7.1 in

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Shroud 

2011

acrylic on aluminium foil

55.5 x 51.5 x 2 cm / 21.9 x 20.3 x .8 in framed

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Sam Keogh, Kapton Cadaverine, Kerlin Gallery, 27 January – 10 March 2018

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Sam Keogh Eurocopter EC135 4 June — 14 August 2016 Dortmunder Kunstverein, Germany

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Sam Keogh Riddle of the Burial Grounds (Group exhibition) 26 March — 17 July 2016 Extra City Kunsthal, Antwerp

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Sam Keogh
Four Fold
Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin
May 22 - July 22, 2015

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Sam Keogh

Mop (detail)

2013

laminated non-slip vinyl floor, found objects, plaster, jesmonite, acrylic varnish, ink, papier-mâché

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Sam Keogh
Terrestris (install view)
2012
Conjuring for Beginners
4 July–11 August 2012
Project Arts Centre
Dublin, Ireland

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  • Sam Keogh, 'Four Fold', Douglas Hyde Gallery, May 2015

  • Sam Keogh, ‘Mop’, Kerlin Gallery, 2014

  • Sam Keogh, The Model, Sligo, Ireland, October 2012

b. 1985, Co. Wicklow, Ireland.
 
Sam Keogh works with installation, sculpture, performance, drawing and collage. In recent work, installations are built to facilitate performances. The work aims to produce an intimate encounter with a grotesque extrapolation of a recognizable image, figure or myth. In recent bodies of work, these have included Sesame Street's Oscar the Grouch, a 2000-year-old Irish 'bog body', and the myth of Medusa. 
 
Keogh is currently in residence at the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin. He has completed an MFA at Goldsmiths College, London (2014) and BA in Fine Art Painting from the National College of Art and Design, Dublin (2009). Forthcoming exhibitions include Eva International, Limerick (14 April – 8 July) and Glasgow International (20 April – 7 May). Recent solo exhibitions include Kapton Cadaverine, Kerlin Gallery (2018); Eurocopter EC135, Dortmunder Kunstverein (2016); Four Fold, Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2015); Mop, Kerlin Gallery, Dublin (2013); Terrestris, Project Arts Centre, Dublin (2012); and Temporary Halo, Storefront, Vancouver BC (2010). 
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Sam Keogh, Glasgow International 2018

20 April – 7 May 2018

Sam Keogh's installation Kapton Cadaverine will be included in Cellular World: Cyborg-Human-Avatar-Horror at GoMA, part of the Director's Programme for Glasgow International 2018.

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Sam Keogh & Isabel Nolan, EVA International 2018

Limerick

14 April — 8 July 2018

Sam Keogh & Isabel Nolan will both participate in the 38th EVA International, curated by Inti Guerrero. 

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Sam Keogh in RijksakademieOPEN 2017

Rijksakademie van beeldende kunsten, Amsterdam

24–26 November 2017

For RijksakademieOPEN 2017, artists of the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam open their studios on 24, 25 and 26 November. Sam Keogh will give three performances during the event, taking place at 5pm daily.

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Sam Keogh in Dark Water: The Dead of Night

CGP London

25 February 2017, 18:00–21:00

Sam Keogh will give a performance as part of Dark Water: The Dead of Night at CGP London.

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2116: Forecast of the Next Century

Eli and Edythe Broad Art Museum, Michigan State University

5 November 2016 – 2 April 2017

Artists: Amanda Coogan, Maud Cotter, Gary Coyle, Eleanor Duffin, Damien Flood, Siobhán Hapaska, Ramon Kassam, Sam Keogh, Ruth Lyons, Eoin McHugh, Ailbhe Ní Bhriain, Mairead O’hEocha, Niamh O’Malley, Darn Thorn, Lee Welch, and the Centre for Genomic Gastronomy.

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Sam Keogh, Eurocopter EC135

Dortmunder Kunstverein, Dortmund, Germany

4 June – 14 August 2016

For his new solo exhibition Eurocopter EC135, Sam Keogh will produce an installation of drawings, sculpture and performance which knots together the murder of Gianni Versace, police helicopters and the red marble clad lobby of Dortmund's Unique Hotel.

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Riddle of the Burial Ground

Extra City Kunsthal, Antwerp

26 March – 17 July 2016

Work by Sam Keogh and Dorothy Cross will be included in Riddle of the Burial Ground, a group exhibition at Extra City Kunsthal, Antwerp. Sam Keogh will also perform at the opening reception for the event, from 7pm, Friday 25 March.


Sam Keogh in Bandits Live Comfortably in the Ruins

Flat Time House, London, UK

3 March – 2 April 2016

Work by Sam Keogh will appear in Bandits Live Comfortably in the Ruins, curated by Sean Lynch at London's Flat Time House.

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Sam Keogh in Hall of Half-Life

steirischer herbst, GrazMuseum, Graz, Austria

27 September 2015 – 11 January 2016

Festival group exhibition

Work by Sam Keogh will be included in Hall of Half-Life, a group exhibition curated by Tessa Giblin for steirischer herbst.

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Sam Keogh, Four Fold

Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin, Ireland

22 May – 22 July 2015

Solo exhibition

In a new solo exhibition at the Douglas Hyde, Sam Keogh explores the Old Croghan Man, one of a number of 2,000 year old ‘bog bodies’ unearthed from Irish wetlands in recent years. 

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Sam Keogh

Terrestris, part of Conjuring for Beginners

03 July 2012 - 11 August 2012

Project Arts Centre, Dublin

Conjuring for Beginnings is an exhibition that will transform the entire Project Arts Centre with three unique shows on each floor.

 

As part of Conjuring for Beginners the Space Upstairs will become a giant gallery filled with sculpture on an enormous scale, by one of Ireland’s most promising young artists Sam Keogh.

 

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Frieze

Glasgow International 2018: Technology and the Animal

1 May 2018

"At the Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), the group show ‘Cellular World: Cyborg-Human-Avatar-Horror’ sets the tone. Especially attention-grabbing is Sam Keogh’s Kapton Cadaverine (2017), an oddball performance-installation that sees the artist emerge from a cryogenic chamber, wearing a suit smeared with bodily fluids, and enact a semi-lucid discussion with the computer of his dilapidated spaceship. ‘Matt Damon doesn’t masturbate in The Martian,’ is one typical observation."—Tom Jeffreys

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The Art Newspaper

Review: Glasgow International permeates city with its distinctively dystopian tentacles

24 April 2018

"There’s a distinctly dystopian feel to the main programme of the eighth Glasgow International (GI), Scotland’s largest festival of contemporary art. In the cavernous ornate hall of Glasgow’s Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), the Irish artist Sam Keogh’s astronaut clambers out of his cryogenic pod, surrounded by the remnants of a destroyed starship, swathed in tatters of plastic and melted electronic detritus."—Louisa Buck

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The Guardian

Glasgow International 2018 review – a uniquely collaborative scene

22 April 2018

"And here is an elaborate white laboratory-cum-studio, hung with extruded plastic sheeting and crawling with some kind of organic growth, which seems to project a futuristic sci-fi dystopia in which computers rule, yet loops back to the past. At its centre is a white steel box from which Sam Keogh, the artist, rises like Frankenstein’s monster during performances. Look closely and you see that it is in fact an old freezer."—Laura Cumming

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The Irish Times

The best art exhibitions this week: Kapton Cadaverine – Sam Keogh

27 January 2018

The premise of Sam Keogh’s sculptural installation and performance (Saturday February 10th, 3pm) is that an astronaut groggily awakens from cryogenic sleep on a dilapidated starship. Both astronaut and starship are distinctly grungy and the worse for wear. The interior is covered with slime and tacked clumsily together. What’s going on? Fragments of a narrative emerge in the astronaut’s dazed monologue – replayed throughout the show.

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ArtReview

Martin Herbert’s pick of exhibitions to see in January & February

January/February

Somewhere up there, figuratively at least, is Sam Keogh, whose Kapton Cadaverine at Kerlin involves a grimy spaceship interior adorned with collages and sculptures. During the opening-night performance that, in a sense, activates these, an astronaut (Keogh) will emerge from his cryopod after a couple of years of suspended animation and engages with the nested creations; the scenario flipping between exploratory reorientation on a rocketeer’s part and tour of an artist’s studio, the accumulations either artworks or attempts to repair the ship. (Audio from the performance, recorded, will float over the installation for the rest of the show.) Keogh, who’s Irish himself, is interested in ‘how surface and texture can transmit narrative’, as was written in a press text for a 2016 show that used drawings under a floor of plastic sheeting, fleshy sculptural lumps and, again, a performative element to loosely consider the death of Gianni Versace. Looking back on Keogh’s earlier work – in 2012, he was making lumpy multicoloured sculptures intended as a kind of ‘species’ – what’s clear is a consistent commitment to art as processual: whatever the form, it’s in a constant, unstable state of becoming and modulation from without.—Martin Herbert

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The Visual Artists' News Sheet

Beyond Matter: Phantasmagoric Fluid

6 January 2017

[…] Live performances were provided by Sam Keogh, Daniel Vorthuys, Jessica Worden and Big Hare. Keogh began by holding a one-way conversation with one of his artworks: a mixed-media sculpture with the appearance of bleached, dead coral. His performance, which drew on the fields of marine biology and haute couture, among other things, was punctuated by impromptu forays into the assembled audience, creating temporary catwalks for his eclectic costumes […] —Pádraic E. Moore

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ArtReview

Nine shows to see: May 2016

May 2016

Something we might prefer to forget – something we are literally burying – is espoused by Riddle of the Burial Grounds at Extra City Kunsthal: the fact that, as a species, we’ve been shoving radioactive matter into the ground on a daily basis since the close of the Cold War, as if sweeping dust under the rug, albeit fatal dust that will sit there for millennia. (Plutonium, for example, is thought to have a hazardous lifespan of at least 240,000 years, with some of its isotopes far hardier than that.) Here, 20 artists, including Dorothy Cross, Mikhail Karikis, Sam Keogh and Lucy Skaer, tackle this dour condition in diverse ways. They’ve acquired – at great effort – the private ownership of mineral rights and photographed what lies beneath the ground; made parquet out of lead acquired from decommissioned power plants; composed choral works dedicated to ruins; filmed one of the world’s largest stalactites; and, of course, more, putting a homonymic ‘seen’ in ‘Anthropocene’.—Martin Herbert

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Totally Dublin

Sam Keogh, Four Fold

July 2015

Sam Keogh’s Four Fold refers to an elaboration on the ‘threefold death’ supposedly inflicted on the Croghan man, a ritual sacrifice involving the delivery of three mortal wounds. Perhaps the fourth fold, then, is the exhumation, exhibition and representation of his remains, an idea that Keogh expounds upon in a playful, personal and reflexive way, raising flaps of vinyl skin like half-teepees embellished with image collages and disembodied hands from the hitherto flat print of the Croghan corpse that spans the entire floor of the gallery. Keogh’s idiosyncratic, bricolage style bears sharp contrast with the mottled, almost banal feeling of the archaeological remains, but in this disparity is revealed a truth. The Croghan Man, the Gebelein Man, the Baronstown West Man: these forms are named, examined and exhibited as generalities, or archetypes, a fact made possible by the shrivelling away of the subjective and the absence of memory, in his reassertion of both of which the artist calls into question not just what or how much we learn of our past by looking back, but what we can learn of our present selves in that petrified instant of self-observation […] –Oisín Murphy-Hall

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The Irish Times

Bring up the bodies – and have a good look at them

2 June 2015

[…] Keogh charged around, raising sections of the image like pages in a giant pop-up book, and propping these flaps up with a number of Flintstones-like devices while gabbling breathlessly. But the surface he opened up was essentially the leathery skin of Croghan Man: he was enacting a haphazard autopsy. The revealed undersides of the skin are collaged with myriad imagery relating to dead bodies, skeletons, fictional reanimated bodies, artificial, robotic bodies – and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. He arrived at the Turtles via a meditation on the taxidermied body of the last Galápagos tortoise, Lonesome George, in the American Natural History Museum. When George died, aged 102, the species became extinct.

The promiscuous mingling of high art and low, pure science and quirky fantasy, the sacred and profane, is typical of Keogh’s sensibility. And he relishes devising ambitious projects for big spaces. He has tackled the Project’s Black Box and the Kerlin’s white cube, and now the cavernous Douglas Hyde is another triumph. —Aidan Dunne

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frieze

Dukkha, Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin

15 September 2014

[…] Spiritual connotations aside, ‘dukkha’ is also a good description of two distinct strands of contemporary practice, which are exemplified in this exhibition. Each have similar starting points and source materials, but tend towards utterly different outcomes. Aleana Egan, Fergus Feehily, Sam Keogh and Paul Mosse all take fragments, large and small, resurrecting the forgotten detritus of familiar and everyday objects, to assemble artworks that hover on the edge of meaning, vague in their associations. But while Feehily and Egan’s work is spare, elegant, and subtle, Mosse and Keogh give the eye a riot of colour and texture, a chaos of shape and form.

In Egan’s story on his hands (2014), a thin panel of off-white material hangs in a loose arch on the wall. Facing it is the steel outline of a chair, the seat empty. The ghost of an audience facing the memory of a stage? Perhaps. In Egan’s haunting work, potential meaning and fleeting ideas resonate gently. But then, high up on the adjacent wall hovers Keogh’s Eyebrows (2014). This is a mad bat-wing extravaganza, a glossy creation of paper, marker, pencil and Sellotape. […] —Gemma Tipton

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The Irish Times

Enter the Grouch: a world inspired by Sesame Street

17 October 2013

[…] MOP is an environment, and its guiding spirit is a fictional character, namely Oscar the Grouch from Sesame Street. Aficionados of the programme may recall Oscar as the churlish, misanthropic character who lives in a rubbish bin, hoards trash and doesn’t have a good word to say about anyone or anything. In the programme’s feel-good aspirational world, he stands resolutely apart. As Keogh notes, his bristling negativity doesn’t stem from any particular dissatisfaction. It’s just his natural state.

Oscar was devised as a means of teaching a preschool audience that they were going to have to cope with otherness in many forms. This means, for example, dealing with people whose values are definitively, irreconcilably different to their own.

Keogh has taken this idea and run with it. At the heart of his labyrinth is a video performance in which he enunciates everything characteristic of Oscar. Appropriately, he does it as a rant, haltingly, angrily and almost incoherently […] —Aidan Dunne

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frieze

Sam Keogh, Mop

January-February 2014

Sam Keogh’s installation at Kerlin Gallery was an antidote and a rejoinder to Dublin’s famously pitiful weather. Outside, the clouds loomed over shopping bags, coffee cups and a litany of other urban realisms, while inside the breezy white-walled gallery, a colourful new world order was underway, built from cultural leftovers and exhausted objects like flotsam on a toxic sea. There were eyeballs, enlarged apple cores, children’s toys and containers caked with pastel-coloured substances – a flaccid, cartoonish re-order of things too numerous to mention.—Matt Packer

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Project Arts Centre

Sam Keogh

20 July 2012

The Irish Times

The exhibition’s coup de théâtre, though, is appropriately reserved for the theatre upstairs, another black space. Here, in the centre of the room, Sam Keogh has ambitiously built a kind of magic mountain, Terrestris, a big hump-backed mound from which slices of matter have been neatly excised. These fragmented blocks are distributed throughout the space, sections of them forming impromptu plinths on which are displayed numerous geodes and crystals and gems and just plain lumps of stuff.

- Aidian Dunne

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