Dorothy Cross

Salve

30 May - 29 June 2002

Dorothy Cross
Salve
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
30 May - 29 June 2002

The Kerlin Gallery is pleased to announce an exhibition of new work by Dorothy Cross entitled 'Salve'.

 

Cross has been exhibiting regularly since the mid-80s and her witty and inventive investigations of contemporary sexual mores and politics have been well documented.

 

In her new exhibition Cross takes the word 'salve' as found in a floorboard in Goethe's house and using a variety of media including sculpture, photography and video proceeds to explore it's multiple meanings. This is reflected in a wide and diverse body of work that has at its core, a meditation on the beauty and mystery of the deep sea. The jellyfish plays a leading role in two of the anchor works in the exhibition. In a new video Cross captures the formlessness and grace of a creature that very little is known about as a human figure floats in amongst thousands of the species presenting a spectacle that is at once mesmerising and threatening. Elsewhere the actual dehydrated residue of individual jellyfish is preserved in a series of framed works on paper. The resultant traces render the creature frozen in time and ghostlike.

 

Cross has participated in numerous group shows internationally including the 1993 Venice Biennial, the 1997 Istanbul Biennial and the 1998 Liverpool Biennial. She also took part in the ground-breaking 1994 exhibition 'Bad Girls' in the ICA London and CCA, Glasgow; the 1998 exhibition 'Mirror Images: Women, Surrealism and Self Representation', which was shown at MIT List Art Center, Boston, Museum of Contemporary Art, Miami and the San Francisco MOMA; 'Skin' (with Ernesto Neto and Yoel Davids) at the Cranbrook Museum, Michigan, USA. Recent solo shows have included Angles Gallery, Los Angeles (1997), Kerlin Gallery, Dublin (1999), Mimara Museum, Zagreb (2000) and Frith Street Gallery, London (2001).

 

Her work is included in the collections of the Irish Museum of Modern Art, the Norton Collection, Santa Monica, the Goldman Sachs Collection, London and the Tate Modern, London, among others.