Willie Doherty

Loose Ends

3rd September - 19th October 2016

Willie Doherty, Loose Ends, 2016, 2 channel HD video, 18 minutes

Willie Doherty, Loose Ends V, 2016, diptych, pigment prints mounted on Dibond, framed, 107.6 x 161 cm / 42.4 x 63.4 in image size 

Additional Views

Willie Doherty, Loose Ends VI, 2016, diptych, pigment prints mounted on Dibond, framed, 107.6 x 161 cm / 42.4 x 63.4 in image size 

Additional Views

Willie Doherty, Loose Ends I, 2016, diptych, pigment prints mounted on Dibond, framed, 107.6 x 161 cm / 42.4 x 63.4 in image size 

Additional Views

Willie Doherty, Loose Ends II, 2016, diptych, pigment prints mounted on Dibond, framed, 107.6 x 161 cm / 42.4 x 63.4 in image size 

Additional Views
Willie Doherty
Loose Ends
3rd September - 19th October 2016

Opening Reception: Friday 2 September, 6–8pm

 

Kerlin Gallery announces Loose Ends, a historic new body of work by the world-renowned Irish artist Willie Doherty (b. 1959, Derry), comprised of a two-screen video installation and accompanying photographic diptychs. The exhibition opens with a reception in the company of the artist on Friday 2 September.

 

Loose Ends turns our attention to the passage of time and its powerful, corrosive effect on our hopes, beliefs and sense of identity. Across two screens, Doherty uses the camera and spoken word to focus on the details and textures of two very different locations. Both associated with the 1916 Easter Rising – a key event in the history of Irish independence, the sites are examined in detail through the use of a slow, almost trance-like, zoom. Doherty’s lens absorbs the material evidence of each location today, 100 years after the events of 1916, asking whether a residual response to these events continues to be played out, or how the voices and actions of one generation and the ‘vapours of the past’ resonate in the unconscious of another. 

 

The work was filmed on Dublin’s Moore Street and Donegal’s Gola Island. Moore Street, the site of the Rising’s final headquarters and ultimate surrender, remains strongly associated with the historical event. Gola Island’s connection to the Rising is more tangential and overlooked, though hindsight helps us to connect these places and events, as it was two fishermen from Gola who in 1914 docked at Howth, Co. Dublin and offloaded a consignment of guns and ammunition that would subsequently be used in the Rising. Doherty’s immersive two-screen installation and related photographic diptychs echo some of the dualities, contradictions and connections between the two locations: urban and rural, East and West, ideology and myth, failure and decay, the remembered and the forgotten, the visible and the absent.

 

Loose Ends is commissioned by Donegal County Council / Regional Cultural Centre in partnership with Nerve Centre, Earagail Arts Festival, Kerlin Gallery and Matt’s Gallery.

It is an ART:2016 Project, part of the Arts Council’s programme as part of Ireland 2016.

Willie Doherty has exhibited in many of the world’s leading museums, including the CAM Gulbenkian, Lisbon; Museum De Pont, Tilburg; IMMA, Dublin; SMK, Copenhagen; Fruitmarket, Edinburgh; TATE, London; Modern Art Oxford; Dallas Museum of Art; Neue Galerie, Kassel; Kunsthalle Bern; Kunstverein München; Kunstverein Hamburg and the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville, Paris. He was nominated twice for the Turner Prize and has participated in major international exhibitions including Documenta, Manifesta, the Carnegie International, and the Venice, São Paulo and Istanbul biennales.

 

For further information, please contact Rosa Abbott, rosa@kerlin.ie.

 

 

Art:2016

 

Download PDF

The Irish Times

★★★★★

Willie Doherty’s Loose Ends was a commission by, among others, Donegal County Council, and is part of the Arts Council’s programme commemorating 1916. It was a key piece in the Earagail Arts Festival.

The Donegal connection centres on Gola Island off the coast. Two fishermen from Gola played an unwitting role in the Easter Rising when they were crewmen on the Asgard, which landed guns at Howth in 1914. Loose Ends is a two-screen video installation that counterpoints footage shot at two locations, Gola and Dublin’s Moore Street, to which the 1916 rebels retreated and where they surrendered.

The videos are accompanied by a lugubrious voiceover. Two other strong video installations by him are currently showing: Remains, from 2013, is at IMMA and Ghost Story, made for the Venice Biennale in 2007, is at the Ulster Museum in Belfast.

In Loose Ends, the voice is Seán McGinley’s. The free-verse text delivers fragmentary snippets, with references to the passing of time, home, violent events. Doherty evokes and links two complementary places and ideas, the hard political reality of the urban east and the mythologised view of the west as an idealised Ireland.

In both cases the camera zooms slowly in on or back from a surface detail. The surfaces, be they urban bricks and mortar or the “pink granite stones” of Gola, are scarred, battered and worn by time. “In the end a fine dust is all that’s left . . . blown away . . . to nothing.” The implication is that both the practical political aspirations and the larger dream underlying them remain unrealised. They are still, presumably, loose ends. A tone of brooding, depressed introspection is considerably ameliorated by the rich visual textures and instances of beauty, however unlikely they may seem.

Aidan Dunne
The Irish Times, 20 September 2016

Visit Website

RTÉ Arena

6 July 2016

Willie Doherty discussed Loose Ends with Seán Rocks on RTÉ's arts programme Arena in July 2016. Click the link below to listen back.

Visit Website