Dorothy Cross, Riddle of the Burial Ground

Project Arts Centre, Dublin, Ireland

11 June – 1 August 2015

Group exhibition

Dorothy Cross, Stalactite, 2010, single channel HD video with sound, installation view of 'Riddle of the Burial Ground', Project Arts Centre, Space Upstairs

Dorothy Cross, Stalactite, 2010, single channel HD video with sound, installation view of 'Riddle of the Burial Ground', Project Arts Centre, Space Upstairs

Dorothy Cross, Stalactite, 2010, single channel HD video with sound, installation view of 'Riddle of the Burial Ground', Project Arts Centre, Space Upstairs

Artists: Lara Almarcegui (ES/NL), Rossella Biscotti (IT/NL), Simon Boudvin (FR), Matthew Buckingham (US), Mariana Castillo Deball (DE/MX), Dorothy Cross (IE), Regina de Miguel (ES), Harun Farocki (DE), Peter Galison & Robb Moss (US), Stéphane Béna Hanly (IE), Tracy Hanna (IE), Mikhail Karikis (GK/UK) & Uriel Orlow (CH/UK), Nicholas Mangan (AU), Tejal Shah (IN)


Curated by Tessa Giblin


This summer, visual art is taking over Project Arts Centre with one of our most ambitious exhibitions to date. Riddle of the Burial Grounds puzzles over signs, forms and communication, motivated by one of the major problems facing our planet – the markings and warnings around nuclear burial sites.


Stored in man-made concrete-clad tunnels deep within mountains or in repurposed salt mines, radioactive matter is being buried that will continue to have the potential to create catastrophic disaster deep into the future, into a period of time we can barely perceive of, yet alone imagine.


We are entering an era that is defined by our impact on earth – the Anthropocene – an era in which human actions have become the dominant force of change on the planet.


Through sculpture, film, photography, documentary, fiction, science-fiction, history, landscapes and imagined futures, Riddle of the Burial Grounds attempts to conceive of a time in which language, signs and forms will be beyond our current comprehension.


How do we communicate beyond the decaying half-life of our current knowledge?


And what will we leave behind?

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