Elizabeth Magill, Headland

Ulster Museum, Belfast

11 May – 23 September 2018

Elizabeth Magill, Still (2), 2017, oil and silkscreen on canvas, 183 x 153 cm / 72 x 60.2 in

Elizabeth Magill, Multi-Storey, 2017, oil and silkscreen on canvas, 145 x 185 cm / 57.1 x 72.8 in   

Elizabeth Magill, Of (2), 2017, mono-screenprint and paint on 600 gsm Somerset Satin paper, 145 x 185 paper size, 148.5 x 188.5 x 5 cm framed size

Elizabeth Magill, Headland (1), 2017, oil and screenprint on canvas, 153 x 183.5 cm / 60.2 x 72.2 in  

Elizabeth Magill, Descend, 2017, mono screenprint and paint on 600gsm Somerset Satin paper, 145 x 185 cm / 57.1 x 72.8 in paper size, 148.5 x 188.5 cm / 58.5 x 74.2 in framed 

Elizabeth Magill, Still (1), 2017, oil and silkscreen on canvas, 183 x 153 cm / 72 x 60.2 in 

Elizabeth Magill, Only Tune, 2016, oil and charcoal on canvas, 153 x 183 cm / 60.2 x 72 in  

Elizabeth Magill, Return, 2016, oil and collage on canvas, 152.5 x 183 cm / 60 x 72 in   

Elizabeth Magill, Dendriform 10, 2012, oil on canvas, 214 x 277 cm / 84.3 x 109.1 in   

Elizabeth Magill, Sulphur, 2017, mono-screenprint and paint on 600gsm Somerset Satin paper, 139 x 173 cm / 54.7 x 68.1 in paper size, 143 x 176.5 x 5 cm / 56.3 x 69.5 x 2 in framed

Elizabeth Magill is one of her generation’s leading painters. Headland will present a body of new work and will introduce her developing practice to a new and established audience. Headland is a touring exhibition, with shows taking place to date at Limerick City Gallery of Art (LCGA); Wilkinson Gallery, London and the Royal Hibernian Academy (RHA), Dublin.

 

“A kind of concentrated ambiguity regarding the natural world …. characterizes Magill’s paintings. Throughout her career, Magill has been drawn to the language of painting using nature and landscape. She draws from them a gorgeous and engrossing multiplicity of visual and sensory description” – Declan Long.

 

Magill’s work is redolent of her sense of place – the Glens of Antrim – which has preoccupied and informed her relationship with her native landscape and her visual response to it. Her approach to painting is always experimental, allowing for previous techniques to give way to newer ones to form an unfolding process.

 

Magill explains that “although my work refers to landscape it is more like an exterior view, an attempt to create a setting or space to place things, a kind of deposit of thoughts and observations within the framework of a personal and painting practice”.

 

As the late John Berger wrote in his last publication Landscape, ‘Sometimes a landscape seems less a setting for the life of its inhabitants than a curtain behind which their struggles, achievements and accidents take place, landmarks are no longer only geographical but also biographical and personal’.

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