IMMA Collection: A Decade

Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin

28 April 2016 - 8 January 2017

Willie Doherty
Remains, 2013
High definition video (colour and sound)
Duration: 15 minutes, Edition 2/3
Collection Irish Museum of Modern Art, Heritage Gift 2014

IMMA Collection: A Decade includes many of the wide range of media represented within the IMMA Collection: painting, sculpture, drawings and prints, photography, film, video, installation and performance giving you a sense of the huge variety of artistic practice in contemporary art. Works selected for this exhibition explore memory, identity and place, and questions of globalism, the environment and connectivity - from the local to the universal.

 

This exhbition presents a selection of significant acquisitions that are the result of generous donations including works such as Cape Siren (2008) by Philip Taaffe and Remains (2013) by Willie Doherty.   The exhibition also presents additional significant gifts from the Novak/O’Doherty Collection, David Kronn Collection, the Graphic Studio and a diplomatic gift of works from the Federal Government of Mexico.  Other featured artists include Pierre Huyghe, Niamh O’Malley, Eva Rothschild, Basil Blackshaw, Tim Robinson, Peter Hutchinson, Howard Hodgkin, Maria Simonds Gooding, Amanda Coogan and others.

 

IMMA Collection: Willie Doherty, Remains, 2013
A key display within the exhibition is Remains, 2013, by Willie Doherty. A recent acquisition to the IMMA Collection it is a powerful fictitious film based on real events. As part of a spate of punishment shootings in 2012 in Derry by the dissident Republican group Republican Action Against Drugs (RAAD), a father was ordered to bring his son and another boy, a cousin, to a specified location to be kneecapped. Such punishments were administered by the IRA to control drug use or anti-social behaviour during the conflict in the North of Ireland but are now used by dissident republicans to exert control. Commenting on the work Doherty stated “I revisit these same locations in Remains to explore the idea of the generational nature of the conflict, how it passes through families and the vicious circle that people can get caught up in".

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