Callum Innes

Callum Innes 
Exposed Deft Blue 2016
oil on linen
120 x 119 cm / 47.2 x 46.9 in 
Callum Innes,
Untitled No 54,
2010,
oil on linen,
195 x 195 cm / 76.8 x 76.8 in 
Callum Innes,
Untitled Lamp Black No 7,
2014,
oil on linen,
200 x 198 cm / 78.7 x 78 in
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Callum Innes,
Exposed Painting Green Lake,
2014,
oil on linen,
125 x 121 cm / 49.2 x 47.6 in  
Callum Innes,
Exposed Painting Scarlet Lake,
2014,
oil on linen,
180 x 175 cm / 70.9 x 68.9 in
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Callum Innes 
Untitled Lamp Black No 12 2013
oil on linen
180 x 175 cm / 70.9 x 68.9 in 
Callum Innes,
Untitled Lamp Black No 15,
2013,
oil on linen,
180 x 175 cm / 70.9 x 68.9 in  
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Callum Innes,
Exposed Painting Blue Lake,
2013,
oil on linen,
235 x 230 cm / 92.5 x 90.6 in  
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Callum Innes,
Untitled No.6,
2013,
oil on linen,
160 x 156 cm / 63 x 61.4 in   
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Callum Innes,
Untitled No. 18,
2012,
oil on canvas,
125 x 121 cm / 49.2 x 47.6 in  
Callum Innes,
Exposed Painting Lamp Black,
2011,
oil on canvas,
125 x 121 cm / 49.2 x 47.6 in   
Callum Innes,
Dioxaine Violet / Yellow Light,
2011,
Watercolour,
56 x 77 cm / 22 x 30.3 in   
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Callum Innes,
Repetition,
2009,
oil on canvas,
160 x 156 cm / 63 x 61.4 in  
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Callum Innes,
Monologue Black 22,
2008,
oil on canvas,
222 x 222 cm / 87.4 x 87.4 in  
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Callum Innes,
Two Identified Forms,
2005,
oil on canvas,
212.5 x 207.5 cm / 83.7 x 81.7 in
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Callum Innes,
Monologue Seven,
2003,
oil on canvas,
227.5 x 222.5 cm / 89.6 x 87.6 in
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Callum Innes,
Exposed Painting, Charcoal Black Yellow Orange Oxide,
2000,
oil on canvas,
247.5 x 237.5 cm / 97.4 x 93.5 in  
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Callum Innes,
Exposed Painting White,
2000,
oil on canvas,
176.5 x 170.5 cm / 69.5 x 67.1 in  
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Callum Innes
I’ll Close My Eyes
2016 - 2017
De Pont Museum, Tilburg
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Callum Innes
Generation
2014
Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh

Callum Innes
Generation
2014
Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh

Callum Innes
Generation
2014
Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh

Callum Innes
Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester
2 March - 16 June 2013

Callum Innes
Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester
2 March - 16 June 2013

Callum Innes
Regent Bridge
2012
Commissioned by the Edinburgh Art Festival and Ingleby Gallery

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Callum Innes
Unforeseen
7 September – 13 October 2012
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin

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Callum Innes
From Memory
30 September – 19 November 2006
The Fruitmarket Gallery

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Callum Innes
Resonance
2005
Tate St Ives

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Callum Innes
1999
Kunsthalle Bern, Switzerland

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Callum Innes
From Memory
2007
Modern Art Oxford

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Callum Innes
What you see is where you’re at
2010
Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, UK

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Callum Innes
Turner Prize
1995
Tate Gallery

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  • Artist Callum Innes talks about his work for GENERATION: 25 Years of Contemporary Art in Scotland.

  • TateShots travelled to Edinburgh to meet Callum Innes, one of the artists featured in Tate Britain's 'Watercolour' exhibition.
b.1962, Edinburgh.
 
Callum Innes is among the most significant abstract painters of his generation. His paintings are highly disciplined but also uncertain spaces, combining the controlled authority of monochrome geometric forms with ever-present traces of fluidity and an always-apparent tendency towards formal dissolution. Central to his distinctive artistic process is a dual activity of painting and ‘unpainting’. Innes begins by applying densely mixed dark pigment onto a prepared canvas before then brushing the wet surface with turpentine: strategically stripping away sections of the painted space before it has entirely settled and solidified. In an ongoing series such as his Exposed Paintings, solid square blocks of deep, complex black are accompanied by lighter zones of varying, more transparent colour – from dioxazine violet to cobalt blue to veronese green – each separated section being the contingent outcome of Innes’s methodical erasure of the painting’s primary material substance. 
 
The applied turpentine makes visible the plural content of apparently monochromatic colour and introduces moments of visual loosesness and liquidity into the otherwise taut compositional order. The results (across the many related series that Innes repeatedly and simultaneously has sought to develop in his thirty year career, such as, alongside his Exposed Paintings, the numerous Monologues and Isolated Forms) are abstract compositions characterized by combinations of absorbing tonal intensity and atmospheric openness. His paintings are at once formally strict and compellingly ‘fragile’, drawing intelligently on long traditions of abstraction just as they also emerge from a very singular – and yet constantly evolving – creative process.
 
Innes has exhibited widely since the mid-1980s. Current exhibitions include I'll Close My Eyes, a major solo show at De Pont Museum, Tilburg. Notable past exhibitions include Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester (2013); From Memory, a major touring exhibition visiting Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, Modern Art Oxford, Kettle's Yard, Cambridge and Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney (2007–2008); Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin; Kunsthalle Bern (both 1999); ICA, London and Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art (both 1992).
 
Innes won the Jerwood Painting in 2002, the prestigious NatWest Prize for Painting in 1998, and in 1995, was shortlisted for both the Turner and Jerwood Prizes in 1995. In 2012, Innes created a permanent commission for the Edinburgh Art Festival, entitled The Regent Bridge. His work is represented in numerous collections, both private and public including Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, NYC; the Centre George Pompidou, France; The Irish Museum of Modern Art; TATE, London; the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh; The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; The National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; the Kunstmuseum, Bern; the Museum of Modern Art, Forth Worth, Texas; and the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo and Deutsche Bank.
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Callum Innes, I'll Close My Eyes

De Pont Museum, Tilburg, The Netherlands

15 October 2016 – 26 February 2017

Museum solo exhibition. An accompanying publication by Hatje Cantz is available.

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Callum Innes

Solo Exhibition

2 March - 16 June 2013

Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester

Whitworth Art Gallery Manchester, presents a solo exhibition of new work by internationally renowned abstract artist Callum Innes. This exhibition showcases a selection of works on paper and new watercolours produced especially for the Whitworth Art Gallery. 

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Callum Innes

The Regent Bridge

02 August 2012 - 02 September 2012

The Regent Bridge, Calton Road, under Waterloo Place, Edinburgh

Celebrated internationally for his abstract paintings, Edinburgh based artist Callum Innes works for the very first time with light, in a simple intervention which floods a dark tunnel on Calton Road with colour to reveal the magnificent architecture of the Regent Bridge above.

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Kerlin Gallery

Callum Innes

December 2012

ArtReview

It’s an enduring problem: how certain pictorial resources, or the imaging capacities of paint, come up against certain material conditions of painting. The title of Callum Innes’s show at the Kerlin, Unforeseen, acknowledges the contingencies variously engaged in addressing this issue. 

- Tim Stott

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Sean Kelly

Callum Innes

06 April 2010

Art in America

NEW YORK Painting—unlike, say, sculpting—can reliably be called an additive process. And abstract paintings composed of paired monochrome fields don’t generally invite the kind of reading we associate with text. These are two assumptions trounced in the new work of Callum Innes, a Scottish painter with a 20-year commitment to deceptively reductive abstraction. Split not-quite-squares, the paintings on canvas (all 2009) in “At One Remove” were each produced by applying sizing (rabbit-skin glue) to canvas, then several layers of gesso, then two adjacent rectangles of solid-color paint, one of which is thoroughly wiped off with turpentine; then two more rectangles of color are applied, and the other side is wiped. Each belabored but resolutely serene final image is divided vertically by a dark line, a residue of the four applications of paint; some evidence of the process can also be found on the edges of the canvas where it wraps around aluminum stretchers.

- Nancy Princenthal

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Ingleby Gallery

Callum Innes

05 August 2009

ArtForum

Inviting  the  mind  neither  to  cling  to  a  particular theme  nor  to  wander,  they  draw  awareness  to  the  rigorous procedure  of  their  creation,  balancing  the  tension  between staying  in  the  moment  and  allowing  the  process  to  unfold.

- Lauren  Dyer  Amazeen

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Modern Art Oxford

Callum Innes

11 March 2007

The Observer

Ommm. Hear the paintings hum

The huge canvases of Callum Innes are so intense, you soon find yourself in a state of meditation. Then you start to admire his fluid technique close-up ...

- Rachel Cooke

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Various  venues,  Dundee

Callum Innes

01 January 2002

Frieze

‘Here  +  Now’  was  the  final  exhibition  in  a  series  of  four dedicated  to  postwar  Scottish  art,  examining  the  period  in which  it  purportedly  emerged  from  its  parochial  house  to  sip avocado  frappés  at  the  café-­bar.  The  push  towards  an  identity for  Scottish  art  in  the  early  1990s  turned  many  artists’  heads to  received  international  concerns.  

-  Neil  Mulholland

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Kunsthalle

Callum Innes

05 May 1999

Frieze

In  the  five  exhibition  rooms,  an  almost  pretentious  quiet prevails,  emanating  from  the  tonal  shifts  within  expansive, monochromatic  colour  fields  ruptured  by  delicate  liquid flows.  The  visual  and  spatial  unity  of  Callum  Innes’  exhibition is  dependent  upon  a  conceptually  motivated  painterly process:  the  application  of  monochromatic  colour  zones within  a  rigid  geometry.

- Hans  Rudolf  Reust
 

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In conversation

Callum Innes

20 August 1991

Frieze

Do  these  paintings  make  sense  when  they’re  hung  side  by side? 

In  the  studio,  l  work  on  several  paintings  at  the  same  time.  I feed  off  one  onto  the  next  piece.  Keeping  them  together  when they’re  shown  is  truer,  but  I  admit  that  when  shown individually,  they  have  more  power.  Apart  from  the  white ones  -­  I  can’t  have  any  distractions  when  I’m  working  on those.
 

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