Maureen Gallace

Maureen Gallace
Sun/Wave/Beach
2014
Oil on panel
25.4 x 25.4 cm / 10 x 10 in 

Maureen Gallace
Blue Beach Shack
2013
Oil on panel
22.9 x 30.5 cm / 9 x 12 in

Maureen Gallace
July Beach House
2013
Oil on panel
27.9 x 35.6 cm / 11 x 14 in

Maureen Gallace
Cape Cod
2011
Oil on panel
22.9 x 30.5 cm / 9 x 12 in

Maureen Gallace
Early September
2011
Oil on panel
28 x 30.5 cm / 11 x 12 in

Cold June Night

2005

oil on panel

22.9 x 30.5 cm / 9 x 12 in

 
Maureen Gallace 
Icy Tree, Monroe, CT 
2001
oil on canvas
25.4 x 25.4 cm / 10 x 10 in  

Clear Day 2017 MoMA PS1, New York

The Paradise [27]
2007
Douglas Hyde Gallery

b. 1960, Stamford, Connecticut.
 
Gallace is an artist who works within the self-imposed confines of a rigorously limited scale and subject matter. She is a painter of small, unpeopled landscapes in which a modest number of elements – a house, a barn, a boat; bushes, grass, sky – recur with a quietly mesmerising insistence. In focusing on a particularly favoured motif, the idealised form of a windowless white New England cottage, Gallace succeeds in isolating something universally familiar yet utterly mysterious. Though instantly recognisable as a work by Gallace, each individual painting is a unique rumination on stillness and structure.
 
Since she began exhibiting in 1990, Gallace has had numerous solo exhibitions in public spaces throughout the US, and also in Britain, Europe and Japan. They include MoMA PS1 (2017); La Conservera, Ceuti (2011); the Art Institute of Chicago Museum (2006); the Douglas Hyde Gallery, Dublin (2004, 2007); Dallas Museum of Art (2003) and the Museum Schloss-Hardenberg in Velbert, Germany (1996). Gallace has also had solo shows at Kerlin Gallery, Dublin; Maureen Paley, London; 303 Gallery, New York and Sprüth Magers, Munich. Group shows in which she has participated include September 11, MoMA PS1, New York (2011); For your eyes only, De Markten, Brussels; Whitney Biennial, New York (2010); FIFTY PERCENT SOLITUDE, Kerlin Gallery (2008); Ideal Standard Life, Spiral/Wacoal Art Center, Tokyo (1996) and Slow Art/Painting in New York Now, PS1, New York (1992). 
 
Gallace's work is represented in many collections, both public and private, including the collections of the Wadsworth Atheneum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. 
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Maureen Gallace, Clear Day

MOMA PS1, New York

9 April – 10 September 2017

Solo exhibition organised by Peter Eleey, Chief Curator, MoMA PS1 with Margaret Aldredge Diamond, Curatorial and Exhibitions Associate, MoMA PS1.

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The Brooklyn Rail

MAUREEN GALLACE: CLEAR DAY

7 September 2017

Scenes are empty of people. No eyes are looking back at us, or at least none that we can see. Often, buildings are depicted without doors or windows; they are containers, ostensibly shapes and structures like anything else that appears in the paintings, such as trees or rocks. Of course, the difference is that the man-made shelters used here—cabins, houses, and garages—have a radically different significance. Just as trees or rocks are indifferent to human presence, so are the man-made structures. To the subjectivity of the viewer or, presumably, also to Gallace, narratives are here to be invented; nothing is provided other than the trace of a loaded brush over a surface. Even if her paintings are indexical, they are paintings—not postcards. We are left asking, where is this? Who might live here, and is anyone home? What time is it? What would I be doing/thinking if standing, staring at this?—David Rhodes

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Hyperallergic

Maureen Gallace’s Uneasy Sublime

6 May 2017

While Gallace’s rural scenes might look serene, creeping trepidation haunts many of them. People are totally absent, and you wonder about that. Oceanfront houses, or those tucked among plants and trees, don’t look homey and inviting; instead they are more like impersonal and inscrutable forces. Gallace doesn’t provide the slightest scrap of a narrative. You don’t know who lives in these houses or if they are inhabited at all; this adds to a sense of mystery. In “September 1st” (2014), a house and an attached garage are surrounded by encroaching, almost menacing green vegetation. Both structures are gray and have blank facades. This home is sealed off from the outside; it’s as if the house and garage have turned into a bunker. In “Cape Cod, Winter” (2004), a white house with a black roof and a nearby white building with a brown roof (this may be either a barn or garage) — both buildings lack windows and a door — are in front of a beige band, for a beach, and a gray-blue band, for the ocean. Again unnaturally white and almost spectral, these buildings are much more extreme than a Cape Cod house shuttered for the winter. They seem to be merging with winter, becoming ice and snow themselves, blending with the sky and ground; they “have been cold for a long time” and evince a desolate “mind of winter,” as Wallace Stevens’ put it in his great wintry poem “The Snow Man.” Half of the sky is a giant white cloud rolling in, poised to envelop and perhaps erase the buildings altogether. Gallace’s local paintings tap into a pervasive national anxiety, an ill-defined feeling of threat coupled with a nagging sense that a bright promise is faltering and may be already gone.—Gregory Volk

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The New York Times

‘MAUREEN GALLACE: CLEAR DAY’

13 July 2017

‘MAUREEN GALLACE: CLEAR DAY’ at MoMA PS1 (through Sept. 10). Win big by going small. This unshowy New York painter has spent 30 years refining her visions of rural Connecticut and the coast of New England, and six dozen of her concentrated paintings will force you to slow down, look hard and find the profound in the everyday. Ms. Gallace’s best works depict houses, barns or cabanas, often missing their windows and pared down to simple polygons; the landscapes they lie in, by contrast, can be worked so hard they appear almost finger-painted. Each one is as sober and strange as a Morandi still life, and an antidote to an art world lately beholden to spectacle.—Jason Farago

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