Paul Winstanley

Paul Winstanley 
Looking at Vermeer 2017
oil and gold leaf on gesso on panel
60 x 55 cm / 23.6 x 21.7 in   
Paul Winstanley 
Faith (After Saenredam) 2016
oil and gold leaf on gesso on panel
72 x 66 cm / 28.3 x 26 in   

Paul Winstanley
Seminar (Blue)
2015
oil on linen
155 x 160 cm / 61 x 63 in  

Art School 18
2013
oil and wax on panel
114 x 76 cm / 44.9 x 29.9 in  

Art School 15
2013
oil and wax on panel
81 x 54 cm / 31.9 x 21.3 in  

Art School 16
2013
oil and wax on panel
144 x 96 cm / 56.7 x 37.8 in  

Art School 14
2013
oil and wax on panel
81 x 54 cm / 31.9 x 21.3 in  

Art School 17
2013
oil and wax on panel
144 x 96 cm / 56.7 x 37.8 in  

Art School 19
2013
oil and wax on panel
114 x 76 cm / 44.9 x 29.9 in    

Art School 22
2013
oil and wax on panel
90 x 60 cm / 35.4 x 23.6 in  

Two Figures on the Shore

2009
oil on linen
125 x 160 cm / 49.2 x 63 in   

The Lake

2002

oil on linen

200 x 300 cm / 78.7 x 118.1 in  

Pavilion 1

2002

oil on linen

105 x 142.5  cm / 41.3 x 56.1 in   

Pavilion 2

2002

oil on linen

105 x 142.5  cm / 41.3 x 56.1 in   

Veil 11

2002

oil on linen

200 x 185 cm / 78.7 x 72.8 in   

Walter Gropius’ Balcony

2002

oil on linen

110 x 146 cm / 43.3 x 57.5 in  

Little Finland

2005

oil on linen

90 x 120 cm / 35.4 x 47.2 in

Night Walkway 1

2005

oil on linen

190 x 253 cm / 74.8 x 99.6 in  

Night Walkway 2

2005

oil on linen

190 x 253 cm / 74.8 x 99.6 in   

Pines Above Jiuhua Shan 4

2006

oil on linen

82 x 59 cm / 32.3 x 23.2 in   

Interior with a Red Chair

2010

Oil on canvas

96 x 68 cm / 37.8 x 26.8 in

Villa

2009

oil on linen

180 x 180 cm / 70.9 x 70.9 in

Stairlevel 1

2008

oil on linen with wood and glass

72.2 x 50.4 cm / 28.4 x 19.8 in

Stairlevel 2

2008

oil on linen with wood and glass

72.2 x 50.4 cm / 28.4 x 19.8 in

Birch 2

2005

oil on linen

220 x 160 cm / 86.6 x 63 in 

Paul Winstanley
Faith After Saenredam and Other Paintings
20th May - 1st July 2017
Additional Views

Paul Winstanley
Art School
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
15th November 2013 - 7th January 2014

Paul Winstanley
Art School
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
15th November 2013 - 7th January 2014

Paul Winstanley
Art School
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
15th November 2013 - 7th January 2014

Paul Winstanley
Art School
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
15th November 2013 - 7th January 2014

Paul Winstanley
Art School
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin
15th November 2013 - 7th January 2014

The Gun Emplacement

Kerlin Gallery

2009

The Gun Emplacement

Kerlin Gallery

2009

The Gun Emplacement

Kerlin Gallery

2009

The Gun Emplacement

Kerlin Gallery

2009

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

China  
2008
Artspace,  Auckland,  New  Zealand

Homeland
2005
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin

Homeland
2005
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin

Homeland
2005
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin

Homeland
2005
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin

Homeland
2005
Kerlin Gallery, Dublin

Paul Winstanley
New Paintings
16 September - 12 October 2002

Paul Winstanley
New Paintings
16 September - 12 October 2002

Paul Winstanley
New Paintings
16 September - 12 October 2002

Paul Winstanley
New Paintings
16 September - 12 October 2002

  • Paul Winstanley : Faith After Saenredam and Other Paintings on Culturefox.tv

b. 1954, Manchester.
 
Paul Winstanley is a painter who uses the ostensibly traditional genres of Landscape / Interior / Still Life / Figure / to create works of conceptual rigour that present the relationship of the viewer to the painting as central to the content of the work. At once methodical and melancholic his painterly depictions of landscapes, walkways, veiled windows, TV Lounges, art school studios and individuals distracted in contemplation are rendered in an exacting and subtle palette. Training initially as an abstract and minimalist painter Winstanley reversed the usual trend of early 20th century artists by moving back towards a new, more self aware representational work. His paintings however do retain much of the aesthetic qualities of the earlier abstraction in their pictorial organisation and minimalist feel. His paintings draw as much from historical northern European artists such as Caspar David Friedrich, Vermeer and Vilhelm Hammershoi as contemporary, more conceptual practitioners such as Richard Hamilton. The images Winstanley creates contain a sense of imposed order as well as an atmosphere of abandonment or expectation and of time inexorably passing. 
 
Winstanley has been exhibiting since the late 1970s and over the past two decades he has had regular solo exhibitions in London, Paris, Munich and New York. His first major retrospective was held at the Auckland Art Space in New Zealand in 2008 was accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. Other solo shows include Annexe, Tate Britain (1998) and Driven Landscapes, Camden Arts Centre, London (1993). Recent group shows include Aesthetic Harmonies, Colby College, Maine (2015); Lifelike, Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, travelling to New Orleans Museum of Art (both 2011); Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego and The Blankton Museum of Art, Austin (both 2012); UNSCHARF: Nach Gerhard Richter, Kunsthalle Hamburg (2011); Self as Selves, Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2009), Inside Architecture, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2008) and 8 Visions, One Dream, Today Art Museum, Beijing (2008).
 
Winstanley's work is represented in numerous public and private collections, including the collections of the Tate Gallery, the British Council, the European Parliament, the New York City Public Library and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.
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A Certain Kind of Light

Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne, UK

21 January – 7 May 2017

Kerlin Gallery artists Mark Garry, Elizabeth Magill and Paul Winstanley are included in a major new exhibition at Towner Art Gallery, A Certain Kind Of Light.

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Sean Scully and Paul Winstanley

Window to the World

25 January 2013

Fondation l'Hermitage Lausanne

Sean Scully and Paul Winstanley are amongst the highly acclaimed artists presenting work in this exhibition, 'Window to the World' at  Fondation de l'Hermitage Lausanne, Switzerland until 20 May 2013.

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Response to a Request

Art School 31

16 October 2016

I first saw Paul Winstanley’s Art School paintings at the Kerlin Gallery in December 2013, where the artist was exhibiting a selection from the already extensive (and still-expanding) set. Of the works on display, most were oil paintings (and photographs) of bare partition walls, the provisional spaces set up as art school studios during the academic year, left empty over the summer and at other fallow periods. These partition paintings have a standardised naming system: each one entitled, simply, Art School, and assigned a number, 1-45.

There are two other standard series within the larger set, Seminar (paintings of empty seminar rooms with their clutter of functional chairs) and Frame (paintings of door, window, and canvas frames), and Winstanley has also exhibited watercolours and etchings based on the original photographs. Reduced almost to abstraction, but loaded at the same time with narrative force and socio-political resonance, these are striking, singular works. With some of the simple, reductive, banner-like qualities of truncated flags, they seem to enact a kind of abstract semaphore. They are also finely pitched, avoiding sentimentality, yet conveying – in a delicate feat – a great deal of pathos.

[…]

- Nathan O'Donnell

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Annual Art Magazine

In conversation with Paul Winstanley

30 June 2015

Paul Winstanley, who paints from photographs, uses a process of accumulation of images and then, removing some parts of it or drawing the eye of the spectator to a detail he highlights, he redesigns them entirely. The everyday functionalplaces which are painted by the artist become a sort of abstraction revealed by a subtle play of light, a technique of the colours and by a sensitive composition. Frequently used, these places symbolise a collective experience and show some cultural peculiarities, applied to a different geographical location and to a different temporality.

ANNUAL Magazine : In ‘L’œil et l’esprit’ by Maurice Merleau-Ponty the philosopher questions the painters vision, capable of watching without categorizing, in contradiction with the profane, who only considers objects. The composition of your paintings is the result of an accumulation of images. How do you proceed in re-constructing an image ?

Paul Winstanley : Paintings are ideas in physical and visual form. As such they need to be exactingly made in every sense. The image is a made thing as the object is a made thing. The two work together and are indivisible. The image exists in a painted form, as a surface of paint, in which resides the illusion of other surfaces, places, people, conditions. I use whatever means necessary to construct the image and convey the sense I want to make. I use photography, I use manipulation, I use drawing. These resolve themselves in the painting, in its surface. This is how it is.

[…]

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Time Out London

Paul Winstanley: Art School

12 April 2016

Come the end of the summer term, art schools turn into strange and sombre places. The degree shows are taken down, materials are stowed away, and all that’s left are empty studios devoid of art, students and creativity.

Which hardly sounds like the best state in which to depict such places, but Paul Winstanley – known for his images of spaces like waiting rooms and office corridors – has created a series of paintings and prints along such lines. He’s worked from photographs. Each picture features a specific art school – but really, it makes no difference whether one is the Slade in London and another Glasgow School of Art. There’s a universality to these images of stud walls, grey lino floors and paint-splattered desks. Inhale: you can practically smell the turpentine.

Okay, not everyone is a nostalgic art graduate like me. But Winstanley is a painter seasoned in bringing a kind of romanticism to the most anonymous of spaces. It’s in his handling of cold light and geometric composition – reminiscent of Vermeer – that these works really come to life. Executed with deadpan sincerity, they’re evocative, melancholy and magical.

- Matt Breen

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Architectural Digest

Painter Paul Winstanley Captures Empty Artists’ Studios on Canvas

31 May 2015

British artist Paul Winstanley’s “Art School” paintings, now on view at the Mitchell-Innes & Nash gallery in Manhattan, take their inspiration from his own photographs of art-student studios left empty for the summer months.

Though imitative of photographs, these delicately realist works are full of painterly depth and texture. Plush grays and downy whites lend the scenes a soft, comfortable, well-worn feeling; the studios are empty and bare, monastic even, but never austere. Signs of craft and toil mark the floors, walls, tables, and chairs. In one piece, a bright orange surface—wall or canvas?—is so close it is almost menacing, an explosion of energy cutting off our view of the serene studio beyond.

This tight cropping obscures depth and angles: Floors bleed into walls, art bleeds into floors, walls bleed into windows. Hazy summer light floods through grand windows and over partial walls. The spaces appear ethereal and dreamlike, ideal for thinking, imagining, and creating—and hard to leave behind, even for summer.

- Alexa Lawrence

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frieze

Paul Winstanley, Artspace, Auckland

22 May 2008

Winstanley works with a range of subtle  effects taken from photographic technologies. Particularly notable are the digital-­like shifts in saturation that play out over a number of the works, where it sometimes feels, when walking from one canvas to the next, as though the brightness has been turned up on the world.

- Louise Menzies

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