Gerard Byrne

In Our Time

2nd December 2017 - 20th January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, 2017, video, unfixed duration

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, 2017, video, unfixed duration

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, 2017, video, unfixed duration

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, Kerlin Gallery, 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

  • Excerpt from Gerard Byrne, In Our Time, 2017, video installation, unfixed duration

OPENING RECEPTION: Friday 1 December 2017, 6–8pm

 

EXHIBITION CONTINUES: 2 December 2017 – 20 January 2018

 

For his solo exhibition at Kerlin Gallery, Gerard Byrne presents a new video installation, In Our Time. Commissioned for the 2017 edition of Skulptur Projekte Münster, In Our Time depicts the daily activities of an archetypal commercial radio station, provoking questions around the relationship between radio broadcasting, time, pop music and collective memory. The exhibition will open with a reception in the company of the artist on Friday 1 December, 6–8pm.

 

Although a 'period' piece, the exact setting of In Our Time remains hard to define, as it depicts a presenter at work in a wood-pannelled American radio studio, playing classic pop songs, taking call-ins and addressing his absent audience via microphone. The camera floats over the period details that make up Byrne's meticulous mise-en-scène: cassettes and vinyl, microphones, speakers and the various other hardware used to coalesce pop music, call-ins and news bulletins into a seamless ethereal broadcast. Of non-fixed duration, In Our Time plays back in sync with actual time of day during the gallery opening hours, and as such establishes a rich relationship between the hidden space of the radio broadcast depicted, and the physical circumstances of the gallery viewer. As with many of Byrne’s previous works, In Our Time conjoins ideas of naturalism from film, physical presence from theatre, together with the concrete temporality of radio broadcasting, into a hybrid form influenced by Bertolt Brecht.


In Our Time is a study of radio as a model of time, from the micro level of adverts or radio jingles, to the macro level of timeless pop classics. The artist utilises and emphasises radio's inherent tapestry-like structure where different references and songs are interwoven, and key motifs are repeated at various intervals throughout the day. Radio’s inherently rhythmic nature – from daily music or talk programmes to updates on weather or traffic repeated at symmetric intervals throughout the hour – creates a modular structure of indefinite duration, similar to the serial qualities of Minimalism. With a focus on this structure and the materiality of the radio studio and its contents, Byrne continues an ongoing interest in the legacies of Minimalism, and the ways in which art engages its own place in time.


Gerard Byrne was born in 1969 in Dublin, Ireland, where he lives and works. Selected solo exhibitions include Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2017); ACCA, Melbourne; Mead Gallery, UK (2016); GrazMuseum, Austria; Kunstmuseum St Gallen, Switzerland (2015); Baltimore Museum of Art, Maryland; Whitechapel Gallery, London (2013); Fundação Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon (2012); IMMA, Dublin (2011); The Renaissance Society, Chicago (2011); Lismore Castle Arts, Ireland (2010); The Common Guild, Glasgow (2010); ICA Boston (2008); Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen (2008); Contemporary Art Centre, Vilnius (2007); MUMOK, Vienna (2006). In 2007, Byrne represented Ireland at the 52nd Venice Biennale. He has also participated in Skulptur Projekte Münster (2017), dOCUMENTA 13 (2012); Performa, New York (2011); the 54th Venice Biennale (2011); Auckland Biennial (2010); Gwangju Biennial (2008); Sydney Biennial (2008); Lyon Biennial (2007); Tate Triennial (2006); and the Istanbul Biennale (2003).

 

For further information, please contact Rosa Abbott, rosa@kerlin.ie.


The Sunday Times

Gerard Byrne, In Our Time

17 December 2017

Video art is often an unsatisfactory medium, as its constraints (screen size, waiting around in a gallery for it to loop) can alienate you from the message. Gerard Byrne’s new video, however, is a fully immersive and engaging experience. You’re dropped into the middle of the action, to which there is no beginning or end. The gallery is blacked out except for a large cinema-sized screen, on which a DJ on an American commercial radio station and his colleagues go about their business, including giving regular time checks, which are in fact synchronised to the current time. The surround- sound system means you can simultaneously hear both the station output and various extraneous noises around the studio — musicians setting up, chairs being moved, snacks being eaten. The period depicted is vague, although some of the songs and the use of audio cassettes and vinyl records suggest the Sixties. The DJ, who had seemed vaguely familiar, turns out to be actor Phelim Drew sporting a luxuriant goatee, an appalling cardigan, and a pair of disturbingly assertive glasses.—John P O Sullivan


The Irish Times

'Radio is built on pattern, like wallpaper'

13 December 2017

Byrne first visited Münster in February 2016. He had it in mind to do a radio-oriented piece at some stage, and it seemed a good fit. “Radio over the airways – not dependent on a broadband connection, say – always appealed to me. That it is so indiscriminate, because you don’t know who’s listening, anyone with a radio can listen.” Somehow, that chimed with the democratic ideal of the sculpture show’s origins. “And I thought, that era of radio, there’s a certain sense of community to it, and it speaks to the idea of a less fractious US.”    In addition he notes: “If you look at my earlier work, there’s long been an interest in the visual re acoustic patterns – some image of time constructed through media. I’m not saying I was thinking of all these things, but all the same I feel they did inform my decisions as I was finding the work.”—Aidan Dunne

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Totally Dublin

Radio Ga Ga: Gerard Byrne, In Our Time

5 December 2017

In Our Time is twelve hours of footage of a fictional radio broadcast, shot with actors in a mise-en-scène created by Byrne at Westland Studios in Dublin. A DJ (played by Phelim Drew) spins tracks, gives weather bulletins, plays jingles and speaks to phone-in listeners from his soundproof booth, while in an adjacent recording studio a group of band members (so it seems) tinker with instruments and chat. The overall effect is something slightly off-kilter, out of joint with its time. Anachronistic props unbalance the general late-70s tone of the environment. The intermittently announced time of the radio broadcast is tied to the real-life time of the gallery, emphasising the real-time nature of terrestrial radio. Nostalgic hits pull the viewer/listener back to the decade past, resulting in a constant tugging of temporal awareness.—Rachel Donnelly

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The Irish Times

Gerard Byrne 'In Our Time'

2 December 2017

Byrne's installations are meticulously staged with high production values. They also work against conventional expectations. He often uses pre-existing texts such as magazine interviews. But it's as if he sets up carefully naturalistic settings and narratives, then approaches them with an eye to achieving a form of Brechtian alienation. The camera moves in unpredictable ways, as though following its own inclinations rather than trying to tell a formulaic story. And actors might deliver lines in disjointed ways, indifferent to habitual dramatic structure or emotional expression. The aim is to throw those structures and conventions into relief, to let the viewer see them out of the context of familiarity.—Aidan Dunne


RTÉ Arena

Gerard Byrne, Kerlin Gallery

29 November 2017

Gerard Byrne discusses his exhibition at Kerlin Gallery with Seán Rocks live on Arena, RTÉ Radio 1.

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Garage Magazine

In Gerard Byrne's New Show, Video Hasn't Killed the Radio Star

3 November 2017

You could sit in Gerard Byrne's In Our Time for hours. When the work was first shown during Sculpture Project Münster, it occupied a warm music practice suite in the German town's enviable public library. Visitors descended to the basement and made their way to a small, darkened room, in which the noise was deadened by heavy doors and soundproofed walls. Within, Byrne's audio-visual work transported one to a comforting wood-lined radio studio in the US from which a deejay with a voice like diner coffee went about an accomplished live broadcast...—Hettie Judah

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artnet news

34 Unmissable Gallery Shows to See in New York City This November

26 October 2017

If you didn’t make it to Skulptur Projekte Münster over the summer, this is your chance to see Gerard Byrne’s video installation In Our Time, depicting the goings-on inside a recreation of a 1970s- or ’80s-era radio station.—Sarah Cascone

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